Ideas & Trends

This colloquium, developed by the Buccino Center Class of 2009, establishes an intellectual framework to facilitate the development of critical thinking skills through the use of innovative technology, fieldwork and collaboration. The course enables students to identify, evaluate and translate ideas and trends into theoretical and conceptual models for leaders to use in addressing future events. Completed during their sophomore year, Buccino Center students prepare themselves for the future by delving into the ideas and trends that continuously disrupt the norms of global/domestic business, politics, culture, and society and which challenge the executives to effectively lead their organizations, its people and the communities they serve.

2009 Project Focus: I Am Change

The Stillman Leadership Development Class of 2009 began work on this project in September 2008 and continued through the 2008/09 academic year. The project deliverable was the development of a seminar that would examine new ideas and the potential trends that result from those ideas. The seminar would incorporate a variety of content sources, disruptive technologies, e.g., Web 2.0 tools, Amazon’s Kindle and Nokia’s E71 mobile device and digital media.  Successful completion of this project would enable Leadership Development students to be better prepared to anticipate, adapt and respond to a constantly changing environment. This project allowed a team of my students and colleagues to fashion a learning environment that incorporated disruptive ideas and technologies. The resulting experience allowed the entire team to stretch their own creativity to craft a truly innovative deliverable that will challenge all who participate in the project in the future. The project was presented in January 2010 to EDUCAUSE Marc. The project video is a great discussion of the Ideas & Trends experience.

2010 Project Focus: Life Is Beta

The 2010 team examined the extraordinary rise of social media and its remarkable impact on daily life with a project titled Life is Beta. In many ways, this subject anticipated full-on adoption of social media as a communications medium by the business community and its role as a facilitator of human rights activities in a variety of countries. The team gained valuable experience by producing a faux newscast discussing their findings. They worked with several digital platforms that supported team collaboration. The reading list for the 2010 team included Innovators Dilemma and Seeing What’s Next (Clay Christensen), The Tipping Point (Malcolm Gladwell), When Markets Collide (Mohamed El-Erian), Wikinomics (Don Tapscott), The Post-American World (Fareed Zakaria). The team delivered its report to the Leadership Council in April 2010.

2011 Project Focus: One Nation Under Surveillance

Ideas & Trends 2011 explored the complex issues surrounding online privacy with a project titled One Nation Under Surveillance. This choice was particularly timely in light of growing awareness of both corporate and governmental surveillance activities. The reading list for the seminar included Innovators Dilemma (Clay Christiansen), Open Leadership (Charlene Li), The Frugal Superpower (Michael Mandelbaum), Switch: How To Change Things When Change Is Hard (Chip Heath and Dan Heath), The Wealth of Networks (Yochai Benkler), and Wikinomics (Don Tapscott). The team delivered its report to the Leadership Council in April 2012.

2013 Project Focus: A Ten Year Horizon

The 2013 seminar was the fourth in the series. The team worked to anticipate the issues that will confront them ten years hence when they are established in their careers and personal lives. The question posed, “What will the future look like in ten years?” was the catalyst for an examination of potential high profile issues including those affecting commercial, geopolitical, environmental and others. The team experimented with a mind mapping application to help organize their work. While the mind mapping experiment was largely ineffective the experience provided the team with an opportunity to work in that environment. The reading list for the seminar included Poke The Box (Seth Godin) and Innovator’s DNA (Clay Christiansen). The team delivered its report to the Leadership Council in April 2013.

2014 Project Focus: Future Learning

The Ideas & Trends 2014 team was challenged to examine the impact of digital transformation in four areas, politics, technology, income inequality and education. The team presented their report to the Leadership Advisory Council in April 2014.

2015 Project Focus: Learning to Learn

The Ideas & Trends 2015 team defined a project that provided an opportunity to learn how to learn in an uncertain environment. Their reading list included Business Adventures: Twelve Classic Tales from the World of Wall Street ( John Brooks) The team was essentially provided with a blank canvas to define, develop and deliver their project. Ideas & Trends 2015, as always, pushed its participants out of their “comfort zones” and demanded that they “figure it out”. They were successful. The team delivered its report to the Leadership Council in April 2015.

2016 Project Focus: Internet Freedom

The 2016 team focused on internet freedom. The project required the team to understand the meaning of internet freedom in its broadest sense. That provided a basis for identifying emerging digital innovations with the goal of understanding the implications of those innovations. The team delivered its report to the Leadership Council in April 2016.

2017 Project Focus: Digital Literacy

The Ideas & Trends 2017 team examined digital literacy. The traditional definition of literacy includes the 3Rs, i.e., reading, writing and [a]rithmetic. It is clear that the combinatorial effects of digital innovation demands that everyone must develop a fourth literacy, the “D” literacy. The team delivered its report to the Leadership Council in April 2017.

2018 Project Focus: Artificial Intelligence

Ideas & Trends 2018 examined artificial intelligence in its various iterations. They built an understanding of the history of AI, the development of its capabilities and applications and the role of regulation in the development of AI. The team delivered its report to the Leadership Council in April 2018.

2019 Project Focus: Future of Work

The 2019 Ideas & Trends team examined the future of work. The impact of digital transformation on the future of work will be profound. The 2019 team developed a broad understanding of issues like the rise of the gig economy, applications of AI and the redefinition of employment roles and required skills, among others. The team delivered its report to the Leadership Council in April 2019.

2020 Project Focus: Artificial Intelligence, Surveillance Capitalism and Identity

The 2020 Ideas & Trends team examined the issues related to the future of work. The impact of digital transformation on the future of work will be profound. The 2020 team developed a broad understanding of issues like the rise of the gig economy, applications of AI and the redefinition of employment roles and required skills, among others. The team delivered its report to the Leadership Council in April 2020.

2021 Project Focus: What Can We Expect in 2030?

The 2021 Ideas & Trends team examined the issues that may define the year 2030. The 2020 team developed a solid understanding of issues like the rise of the gig economy, applications of AI and the redefinition of employment roles and required skills, among others. The team delivered its report to the Leadership Council in April 2021.

2022: Project Focus: Climate Change: The Choice Is Ours

The 2022 Ideas & Trends team examined the issues related to future of work. The impact of digital transformation on the future of work will be profound. The 2022 team developed a broad understanding of issues like the rise of the gig economy, applications of AI and the redefinition of employment roles and required skills, among others. The team delivered its report to the Leadership Council in April 2022.

2023: Project Focus: The Metaverse

The 2023 Ideas & Trends team examined the issues related to metaverse and its impact. The 2022 team developed a broad understanding of issues like the rise of the gig economy, applications of AI and the redefinition of employment roles and required skills, among others. The team will deliver its report to the Leadership Council in April 2023.

 

 

AT: Review This First

You invade my privacy; it’s nothing. I try to get it back; it’s a crime. You’ll never understand… it’s not that I have nothing to hide… I have nothing I want you to see. – THE GIRL, ANON

Stillman’s Mission

… is to enrich each student’s life through an ethics-centered education focusing on transforming concepts into business practice.

Welcome To The Course

Welcome to Advanced Topics. This is part of your course syllabus. We will meet for the first time on Wednesday, January 17th at 330p in JH111. I will update this syllabus if I add something to the course or if something unexpected intervenes … like a hurricane or blizzard. You’ll need to keep current on course assignments and materials by reviewing this syllabus regularly for updates.

You should carefully review the entire course syllabus, calendar, deliverables, schedule, and any other materials included in this course site. You will find answers to any questions when you review the rest of the information contained on this site. If you have any questions after you’ve reviewed this syllabus and the rest of the course site, you can DM me in Teams to contact me.

Before We Meet

Before we meet, please click Before We Begin to complete some housekeeping items that include introducing yourself, agreeing to the learning contract, and completing your O365 profile by adding a headshot as your profile picture. Please bring a mask to every class meeting since we will be wearing masks during class.

Visit our Teams workspace. It would be best if you visited right away since all of our course communication will be via Teams, and I won’t be using email for our course communication in the future.

Introduction

Managers face various legal challenges that can both help and hinder success. This course examines several advanced topics in the legal environment that will provide a foundation that will equip students to recognize the legal challenges they will encounter as managers. We will focus on issues related to information privacy law during this semester. While we will not turn students into lawyers, we will develop the legal knowledge and analytical skills that guide entrepreneurs in a complicated legal environment.

What Should You Expect?

The course’s subject matter is interesting, challenging, and timely. We will cover some very interesting topics that are particularly important in the 21st-century economy. We will use various digital platforms to interact with each other and the course materials.

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced us to use a fundamentally different set of delivery modalities, e.g., in-person, HyFlex, hybrid, remote, synchronous, or not, or some combination of approaches to teaching and learning. We have met remotely, when necessary, to accomplish our work over these last several years. The use of remote modalities demands that we adjust our understanding of acceptable protocols for attendance and participation, whether a meeting or course attendance, engagement, and participation.

While working together using a digital platform, e.g., Teams, Zoom, Slack, etc., you must join the session with a live camera and muted mic. A live camera helps to create a sense of community and will help all of us to engage effectively during our discussions. If you only unmute your mic when speaking, we can avoid feedback, unsolicited input from family, pets, and others, and random noise. If your classmates cannot see or hear you, actively engaging in course meetings will be difficult. That will have negative implications for your grade results. Please look at the Protocols for Online Meetings and Classes for more information.

I will actively engage you using the Socratic Method in class and during our discussions outside class. You will better understand my class sessions after you read my perspective on Teaching and Learning.

Learning Objectives

This course is an elective required for those students who have decided to pursue the Minor in Legal Studies. The course will help prepare students to meet the legal and regulatory challenges and opportunities they can expect to encounter as managers of private and public businesses. The course provides a conceptual framework for understanding the various legal tools available to managers who evaluate and pursue opportunities. This course will not make you a lawyer. It will, however, help you develop insights into the law and help you handle the legal aspects of management.  This includes developing legal literacy, learning what to look for when selecting an attorney, and knowing when to call one.

Required Casebook

Information Privacy Law, 8 Ed., Solove, Daniel J. and Schwartz, Paul M., Aspen Publishing 2024 ISBN 979-8-8861-4335-5 (print) ISBN 979-8-8890-6572-2 (eBook). The print edition of the text may be available in the SHU bookstore. If it is unavailable there, you can purchase the print or eBook version of the text here.

Additional Materials

All of the course materials are available as links that you will find at ShannonWeb. I may assign additional materials for use in our course. I will post links to those materials in advance in the Course Schedule. Please check the syllabus regularly for updates.

Technology

Since you have reviewed my Course Policies, you already know my expectations about using technology in my courses. Participating in this course will require you to engage with several digital platforms. Be sure to carefully review the materials included in Writing on a Digital Platform and Writing and Research. Our communication and collaboration platform will be Teams. If you need to reach me or have questions, please DM in Teams. We use Teams video for our virtual office hours. You will prepare your writing assignments using digital platforms that will allow you to incorporate multimedia to enhance your text-based content. You will use resources as varied as a search engine (ChatGPT, Perplexity, GoogleDuckDuckGo, or Bing) and the resources available from our Walsh Library.

You are responsible for “figuring it out” regarding a project’s “how to” aspects. If you don’t know how to do something … “search for it”!

Many students have told me that “figuring it out” was an unexpected and beneficial experience and a critical learning outcome.

Course Policies

You are responsible for becoming familiar with my Course Policies, including in-class performance, attendance, preparation & participation, assignments, course communication, assessment, and plagiarism. Please review them carefully.

As in the law … ignorance (of the Course Policies) is not an excuse.

Contact Me

Professor John H. Shannon

  • Office: 651 Jubilee Hall or Teams
  • Communications: Teams DM (preferred)
  • Office Hours: Mon & Wed, 10a – 1130a (click the link in your Teams Calendar to join Office Hours); also by appt, all office hours and other meetings will be held via Teams

We can schedule an alternative meeting time if you are unavailable during my office hours. As you know, our course communications platform is Teams. Please DM me in Teams with some days/times when you are available, and we can schedule a video conference in Teams.

I can be reached via any number of platforms … Teams (preferred), email, voice, or video. As a general rule, I am available if I am online. You can DM me in Teams or post a question to the Course Questions channel in our  Teams workspace. I will try to reply to any communications as soon as possible, but certainly no more than 24 hours after receipt. If you prefer a video conference (and who doesn’t?), please DM me with some convenient days/times, and we’ll set it up.

My office hours are subject to change every semester, so please check your course syllabus for my current office hours (see above). In the past, I have generally scheduled at least one hour a week using Teams video to accommodate those who have a conflict with my scheduled office hours. Since we are conducting all office hours and other meetings via Teams, and if you are unavailable to meet during my office hours, you can schedule an appointment for a video conference via Teams. I prefer video conferences because they give me more options when answering your questions.

That said, I carve out space for thoughtful consideration of life. The practical impact of that desire is to keep evenings and weekends clear for family, friends, and other forms of social interaction. If you are going to ping me late on a Friday, then I will get back to you on Monday unless it is an emergency … a REAL emergency.

When communicating with me, please include the following information: your name, the question or issue to be resolved, your course/section, and any other necessary information.

AT: What Should You Expect?

Advanced Topics is offered each spring semester. The first half of the course is focused on an area of law that is in active discussion in the law, business and technology spaces. We have, in past semesters, taken a deep dive into antitrust law, intellectual property and privacy and surveillance, among others. The second half of the course focuses on twelve cases decided by SCOTUS in the previous term. The subject matter of these cases examines arbitration, first amendment, discrimination, immigration, presidential Immunity, trademarks and voting rights, among others.

The subject matter of the course is interesting, challenging and very timely. We will cover some very interesting topics that are particularly important in the economy of the 21st century. We will use a variety of digital platforms to engage with each other and the course materials. The course deliverables have included case analyses, case simulations and robust discussions of the issues as they affect law, business and technology

I will actively engage you through the use of the Socratic Method, both in class and during our discussions outside class. You will have a better sense of my class sessions after you read my perspective on Teaching and Learning.

LFB: Review This First

Stillman’s Mission

… is to enrich each student’s life through an ethics-centered education focusing on transforming concepts into business practice.

Welcome To The Course

Welcome to the Legal Environment of Business. This is the first section of your course syllabus. We will meet F2F weekly both in class and, when necessary, remotely via Teams. I will update this syllabus if I add something to the course or if something unexpected intervenes … like a hurricane, blizzard, or returning to fully remote class meetings. You’ll need to keep current on course assignments and materials by reviewing this syllabus regularly for updates.

You should review the course syllabus beginning with Review This First and then the calendar, Deliverables, Schedule, and any other materials included in this course site. You will find answers to any questions after reviewing the rest of the information here. If you have any questions after you’ve reviewed this syllabus and the rest of the course site, you can DM me in Teams to contact me.

Before We Meet

We will meet for the first time on Wednesday, January 17th, at 2p in JH111. We will meet F2F unless notified otherwise. Our course will require masks in class. Please bring a mask to every class meeting since we will be wearing masks during class. Before we meet, please click Before We Begin to complete some housekeeping items, including introducing yourself, agreeing to the learning contract, and finishing your O365 profile by adding a headshot as your profile picture.

You will find your Teams workspace by clicking the Teams icon in the sidebar of the Teams app. Please complete your signup immediately since all of our course communication will be via Teams, and I won’t use email for our course communication in the future.

Introduction

This course’s subject matter will include an introduction to the American legal system, incorporating a survey of US court systems and types of jurisprudence, and an introduction to the US Constitution with an analysis of certain basic constitutional concepts, constitutional amendments, and illustrative cases. We will examine ethical and international legal perspectives related to contemporary business. Areas of study will also include contract law, the law of business organizations, and the regulatory environment. Students will examine the ethical challenges that arise between law and business.

What Should You Expect?

The course’s subject matter is interesting, challenging, and always timely. While we examine the basis and evolution of our legal system, we will always keep an eye on how that system impacts the business environment in real-time. We will use various digital platforms to interact with each other and the course materials. You will actively engage in the course using the Socratic Method in class and during our digital discussions outside class. You will better understand what to expect during a class session after you review my perspective on Teaching and Learning.

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced us to use a fundamentally different set of delivery modalities, e.g., in-person, HyFlex, hybrid, remote, synchronous, or not, or some combination of approaches to teaching and learning. We have met remotely, when necessary, to accomplish our work over these last several years. The use of remote modalities demands that we adjust our understanding of acceptable protocols for attendance and participation, whether a meeting or course attendance, engagement, and participation.

While working together using a digital platform, e.g., Teams, Zoom, Slack, etc., it is essential that you join the session with a live camera and muted mic. A live camera helps to create a sense of community and will help all of us to engage effectively during our discussions. If you only unmute your mic when speaking, we can avoid feedback, unsolicited input from family, pets, and others, and random noise. If your classmates cannot see or hear you, it won’t be easy to engage in course meetings actively. That will have negative implications for your grade results. Please look at the Protocols for Online Meetings and Classes for more information.

I will actively engage you using the Socratic Method in class and during our discussions outside class. You will better understand my class sessions after you read my perspective on Teaching and Learning.

Learning Objectives

This is an introductory class in the legal environment intended to help students improve critical thinking, communication, oral presentation, technology, and ethics. This course will help prepare students to meet the legal and regulatory challenges and opportunities they can expect to encounter as managers of private and public businesses. The course provides a conceptual framework for understanding the various legal tools available to managers who evaluate and pursue opportunities. The objective is not to teach business students how to think like lawyers but to teach them how to become more legally astute so they can confidently handle the legal aspects of management.

Required Course Text

Hunter, Shannon, Amoroso & O’Sullivan-Gavin. Law, Business, and Regulation: A Managerial Perspective, CreateSpace (2017).

The required course text is available from several sources.

Professors Hunter, Amoroso, O’Sullivan-Gavin, and I have decided to provide a digital version of the text for your use at no cost to our students. You will find the digital version here. Access to a digital version of the text will facilitate your coursework.

If you prefer a print copy of the text, it is available from the SHU bookstore. Before our first class meeting, you will need the text to complete the assignments described in the Schedule.

N.B. Do not purchase, or use, The Legal Environment of Business: A Managerial and Regulatory Perspective, 3rd Ed. CreateSpace (2011).

Additional Materials

I may assign additional materials for use in our course. I will post links to those materials in advance in the Schedule. Please check the syllabus regularly for updates.

Technology

Since you have reviewed my Course Policies, you already know my expectations about using technology in my courses. Participating in this course will require you to engage with several digital platforms. Our communication and collaboration platform will be Teams. If you need to reach me or have questions, please DM in Teams. We use Teams video for our virtual office hours on Tuesday mornings. You will prepare your writing assignments using digital platforms that will allow you to incorporate multimedia to enhance your text-based content. You will use resources as varied as a search engine (GoogleDuckDuckGo, or Bing), the resources available from our Walsh Library, and various GenAI platforms.

You are responsible for “figuring it out” regarding a project’s “how to” aspects. If you don’t know how to do something … “Google” it!

Many students have told me that “figuring it out” was an unexpected and beneficial experience and a critical learning outcome.

Remote Learning

If circumstances (hurricane, COVID spike) demand it, we will be prepared to adapt and move to a remote, synchronous learning environment.

The COVID-19 pandemic forced us to move to a fundamentally different set of delivery modalities, e.g., HyFlex, hybrid, remote, synchronous, or not, or some combination of approaches to teaching and learning. We are increasingly working remotely to accomplish our work. That remote modality demands that we adjust our understanding of acceptable protocols for attendance and participation, whether a meeting or course attendance, engagement, and participation.

While working together using a digital platform, e.g., Teams, Zoom, Slack, etc., it is essential that you join the session with a live camera and muted mic. A live camera helps to create a sense of community and will help all of us to engage effectively during our discussions. If you only unmute your mic when speaking, we can avoid feedback, unsolicited input from family, pets, and others, and random noise. If your classmates can see or hear you, it will be easier to engage in course meetings actively. That will have negative implications for your grade results. Please review the Protocols for Online Meetings and Classes for more information.

Course Policies

Please know that you are responsible for becoming familiar with my Course Policies, including in-class performance, attendance, preparation & participation, assignments, course communication, assessment, and plagiarism. Please review them carefully.

As in the law … ignorance (of the Course Policies) is not an excuse.

Contact Me

Professor John H. Shannon

  • Office: 651 Jubilee Hall or Teams
  • Communications: Teams DM (preferred)
  • Office Hours: Mon & Wed, 10a – 1130a (click the link in your Teams calendar to join Office Hours); also by appt, all office hours and other meetings will be held via Teams

We can schedule an alternative meeting time if you are unavailable during my office hours. As you know, our course communications platform is Teams. Please DM me in Teams with some days/times when you are available, and we can schedule a video conference in Teams.

I can be reached via any number of platforms … Teams (preferred), email, voice, or video. As a general rule, I am available if I am online. You can DM me in Teams or, if you are already enrolled in one of my courses, post a question to the #Course Questions channel in our course’s Teams workspace. I will try to reply to any communications as soon as possible, but certainly no more than 24 hours after receipt. If you prefer a video conference (and who doesn’t?), please DM me with some convenient days/times, and we’ll set it up.

My office hours are subject to change every semester, so please check your course syllabus for my current office hours (see above). In the past, I have generally scheduled at least one hour a week using Teams video to accommodate those conflicting with my scheduled office hours. Since we are conducting all office hours and other meetings via Teams, and if you are unavailable to meet during my office hours, you can schedule an appointment for a video conference via Teams. I prefer video conferences because they give me more options when answering your questions.

That said, I carve out space for thoughtful consideration of life. The practical impact of that desire is to keep evenings and weekends clear for family, friends, and other forms of social interaction. If you are going to ping me late on a Friday, then I will get back to you on Monday unless it is an emergency … a REAL emergency.

When communicating with me, please include the following information: your name, the question or issue to be resolved, your course/section, and any other necessary information.

LFB: What Should You Expect?

The subject matter of the course is interesting, challenging and always timely. While we examine the basis and evolution of our legal system and we will always keep an eye on how that legal system impacts the business environment in real time. The subject matter will include an introduction to the American legal system, incorporating a survey of US court systems and types of jurisprudence; an introduction to the US Constitution with an analysis of certain basic constitutional concepts, constitutional amendments and illustrative cases. We will examine ethical and international perspectives of the law related to contemporary business. Areas of study will also include contract law, the law of business organizations and the regulatory environment. Students will examine the ethical challenges that arise at the intersection of law and business.

This is an introductory class in the legal environment that is intended to help students improve in the competencies of critical thinking, communication, oral presentation, technology, and ethics. This course will help prepare students to meet the legal and regulatory challenges and opportunities they can expect to encounter as entrepreneurs and/or managers of private and public businesses. The course provides a conceptual framework for understanding the various legal tools available to managers engaged in evaluating and pursuing opportunities. The objective is not to teach business students how to think like lawyers, but rather to teach students how to become more legally astute so they can handle the legal aspects of management with confidence.