Deliverables

Reading

You will have reading deliverables for each class meeting … they must be completed before you arrive for class. If you are not prepared for class it will be very difficult, if not impossible, for you to engage effectively in our class. If you consistently do not engage effectively in class discussions it will have a negative impact on your performance and, therefore, my assessment of your performance. Your success in our course will require you to actively participate in the discussions that we conduct in person and in the cloud. The difference between engagement in a F2F and an online course is really about the platform.

Writing on a Digital Platform

Many of you may be unfamiliar with writing in a digital platform. Since this may be the first time that you will work in a digital platform I suggest that you review Professor Gerald Lucas’ essay, Writing Top Ten, as a starting point. If you are unfamiliar with the appropriate way to source your digital writing, and most of you will be, please review his discussion of Digital Citation for additional guidance on citation when using a digital platform. Since the correct use of hyperlinks will be important to your success in our course discussions I recommend that you consider his advice on using links in your digital writing.

When you use digital platforms to support your submissions you must incorporate multimedia (audio, video and images) in all of your writing deliverables. It is important for you to transition from thinking in terms of text on paper to a text+ environment. As Bo Ren suggests in his essay Why I Believe in Text,

“The future of text is going to be text+ (text + multimedia e.g. photos, videos, gifs, podcasts etc). … readers and users want text+ for a faster, more immersive, gratifying consumption experience. Multimedia stories are the future of text.”

If you have never used Teams before, visit the Microsoft Teams for Education – Quick Start Guide and video training for Teams.

Writing and Research

Many of your course deliverables will involve research and writing. Those assignments will also require that you meet both content and form requirements. I describe the requirements of each deliverable in terms of minimums to provide you with the opportunity to exceed those minimums. Most deliverables involve the use of digital platforms to deliver the content you have developed.

The content requirements are straightforward. You must provide a thoughtful, substantive and well-reasoned submission that draws upon the course readings and materials and that details your perspective and analysis of the implications of the issues raised in the question(s) posed. It is also important that you address the ethics issues raised by the assignment. You must also include sources sufficient to support all aspects of your submission.

The content requirements represent a significant expectation of performance. I may set a minimum requirement for the number of sources used in your submissions. I expect that your sources will be sufficient, both in quality and number, to support the breadth of analysis that I have described above.

The form requirements are equally straightforward. These form requirements are generally described in terms of a minimum word count and the use of live, in-text hyperlinks in lieu of footnotes/endnotes (please see Writing on a Digital Platform above). When you use digital platforms to support your submissions you must incorporate multimedia (audio, video and images) in all of your writing deliverables.

My assessment of your submission will be based upon the extent to which you meet the minimum requirements as to content and form required by that particular deliverable. You can improve your prospects for a strong outcome by exceeding the minimum requirements of the deliverable, i.e., expanding the scope of your content and analysis of the question posed, including addressing potential ethics issues, broadening the scope of the sources used to support that content and analysis, and meeting the form requirements outlined above.

It is important to remember, though, that if you simply meet the minimum requirements the result will be an average grade.

Writing deliverables will be completed using a digital platform unless otherwise specified. Please see your course syllabus for the specific assignment requirements.

Do not post a Word document or Google doc unless the deliverable specifically requires it.

Connectivity

When taking a quiz or exam, please be certain that your broadband connection is reliable and stable. My students in past semesters have occasionally experienced connectivity issues. In the past, this type of connectivity problem arises as a result of an interruption in your connection (a hiccup in your broadband connection) to Blackboard or where the test has opened in a new tab or window. When that happens your connection times out in the first tab/window while you are working in the second. That has the same effect as the first possible cause … your connection to Bb is interrupted. Your quiz/exam stays active in the second tab/window but stops recording questions because the connection was interrupted due to the timeout in the first tab/window. Your best option is to be sure that your browser opens the quiz/exam in the same tab/window where you originally logged into Blackboard.

Most frequently connectivity issues arise when using Wi-FI particularly when using a public Wi-Fi hotspot. It is best if you avoid public Wi-Fi hotspots when taking a quiz/exam. Be certain that your Wi-Fi connection is strong and stable. I suggest, if possible, that you connect your computer directly to your Internet source (router) via an Ethernet cable. This should assure that you have a stable connection while completing the course assignments.

If your connection is interrupted, I suggest that you exit Bb, login again, try to reenter the same quiz/exam attempt and finish the quiz/exam.

Assessment

This information is related to my undergraduate courses. I suggest you review it carefully before your course begins.

Performance

I describe my expectations for your performance in my classes in the Deliverables and Engagement pages of this section. If you have not reviewed them yet, please take a moment and review them before proceeding with this section.

I have very high expectations for performance for my students. I expect that you will bring your best efforts to all of your interactions with your classmates, our course and with me. I presume that you are attending college, and our course, because you are interested in your future success.

You are constructing the platform on which you will build your professional, and personal, lives. That should be sufficient incentive to encourage you to invest in the learning environment we are developing, and those involved in that learning environment, to the fullest extent possible.

Please approach this experience accordingly.

Deliverables

All of my deliverables have hard deadlines. If you miss a deadline you will receive no credit for that assignment. The excuse of “my dog ate my homework” or its 21st century equivalent “my computer crashed” are not acceptable. “I forgot” or “I didn’t calendar the deliverable” or “I didn’t set a reminder” or “I had other assignments due” do not work for me … nor will they work for you.

It is important that you provide your analysis of the issues presented by any deliverable … whether that is a discussion board, journal post, blog comment or POV. Simply regurgitating the content of the question or article is not acceptable … think back to your first book report in elementary school … since I already know what happened in the book you do not really need to tell me again. It is infinitely more important that you demonstrate your understanding of the issues presented and their relevance in context.

My assessment of your submissions will also be based upon the extent to which you meet the minimum requirements of the deliverable. Most deliverables will be described with minimum word and source counts. Page counts are irrelevant when working in digital platforms so the minimum word and source counts will provide you with an expectation framework. You can improve your prospects for a strong outcome by exceeding the minimum requirements of the assignment. And remember that simply meeting the minimum requirements will result in an average grade.

OMG … Technophobia!!!

PLEASE do not tell me that you “are not a technology person” … we are clearly past the point where a lack of familiarity with technology is a good idea or at all acceptable. Since Fear of Technology
we rely on these devices and platforms you should be certain that your mobile device is connected to your SHU email and calendar accounts as well as Teams.

This site and Blackboard are not optimized to play well with Internet Explorer. I suggest that you use either Firefox or Safari as your browser.

That said, mine are not IT courses … they are courses that examine different areas of law. It happens that we will use a variety of different technology platforms to support our work … much the same as you will in your personal and professional lives.

I may be able to assist you with a hardware or software issue. However, it is your responsibility to be sure that both are in good working order. Be certain that your computer’s operating system, browser(s) and the variety of installed software is up-to-date,  If something isn’t working … get it fixed  … in a timely manner. That’s why we have PC Support Services and a Help Desk.

You are responsible for “figuring it out” when it comes to the “how to” aspects of a project. If you don’t know how to do something … “Google it!” … or, of you don’t want to be tracked use Duck Duck Go for search.

In fact, many of my past students have told me that mastering the art of “figuring it out” was both an unexpected and beneficial experience and a critical learning outcome in my courses.

Grading

Remember, as I noted above, that I have very high expectations for performance for my students. I expect that you will bring your best efforts to all of your interactions with your classmates, our course and with me. That will require you to do your best work in our course.

As I note in the Deliverables page, my assessment of your submissions will be based upon the extent to which you meet the deliverable’s minimum requirements as to content and form. You can improve your prospects for a strong outcome by exceeding the minimum requirements for that deliverable, i.e., expanding the scope of your content and analysis, including addressing potential ethics issues, of the question posed,  broadening the scope of the sources used to support that content and analysis, and meeting the form requirements outlined above.

It is important to remember, though, that if you simply meet the minimum requirements the result will be an average grade.

If you fail to participate at all, or do not meet the deliverable’s deadline, you will receive zero points and a grade of “F” for that deliverable. If you only partially meet the deliverable’s requirements you will earn a maximum grade of “D”. If you meet the deliverable’s requirements your submission will be evaluated and assigned a grade subject to the Grade Ranges described below.

I generally do not accept late submissions for credit unless you have experienced a real emergency. I will consider your reasons for missing a deadline if you submit them for my consideration in a timely manner via a Teams DM. That said, a real emergency does not arise if you miss the assignment or deadline because you did not calendar it, or you experienced a conflict that was avoidable or you simply forgot the deadline.

Grade Ranges

This table describes the range of points assigned to a particular grade.

A 95% – 100% C+

77% – 79.9%

A-

90% – 94.9% C

73% – 76.9%

B+

87% – 89.9% C- 70% – 72.9%

B

83% – 86.9% D+

65% – 69.9%

B- 80% – 83.9% D

60% – 64.9%

F

< 59.9%

LFB: Schedule

Before Module 1 (before August 24th)

Complete this deliverable by visiting the Before We Begin page in ShannonWeb.

Module 1: Introduction To The Legal Environment

Week 1, Classes 1 & 2

Before Class:

  • Read and prepare the cases and materials in Chapter 1, The American Legal System
  • Watch the videos on the American Legal System

During Class:

  • Introduction to the course
  • Discuss the cases and materials in Chapter 1, The American Legal System
  • Review current events

Deliverable(s):

  • Develop your Success Plan

Week 2, Classes 3 & 4

Before Class:

During Class:

  • Discuss the cases and materials in Chapter 2, Court Systems
    • International Shoe Co. v. State of Washington (p14)
    • Harrods Ltd. v. Sixty Internet Domain Names (p22)
  • Review current events

Deliverable(s):

  • Success Plan due Thursday no later than 10:34p
  • Brief International Shoe Co. v. State of Washington (see the textbook, Appendix C for guidance on briefing a case)
  • Complete two (2) comments on the Course Blog no later than Friday evening at 9p

Week 3, Class 5

Monday: Labor Day – No Class

Before Class:

During Class:

  • Discuss the cases and materials in Chapter 3, Constitutional Perspectives
    • City of Burbank v. Lockheed Air Terminal, Inc. (p41)
    • NLRB v. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp. (p46)
    • Wickard v. Fillburn (p49)
    • Heart of Atlanta Motel v. United States (p51)
    • Family Winemakers of California v. Jenkins (p54)
    • Gonzalez v. Raich (p57)
    • Mennonite Board of Missions v. Adams (p63)
    • Kelo et al. v. City of New London et al. (p66)
    • Packer Corporation v. Utah (p69)
    • Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corp. v. Public Service Comm’n (p72)
    • Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. (p76)
  • Review the Constitution of the United States of America
  • Review current events

Deliverable(s):

  • Complete two (2) comments on the Course Blog no later than Friday evening at 9p

Week 4, Classes 6 & 7

Before Class:

During Class:

  • Discuss the cases and materials in Chapter 3, Constitutional Perspectives
    • City of Burbank v. Lockheed Air Terminal, Inc. (p41)
    • NLRB v. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp. (p46)
    • Wickard v. Fillburn (p49)
    • Heart of Atlanta Motel v. United States (p51)
    • Family Winemakers of California v. Jenkins (p54)
    • Gonzalez v. Raich (p57)
    • Mennonite Board of Missions v. Adams (p63)
    • Kelo et al. v. City of New London et al. (p66)
    • Packer Corporation v. Utah (p69)
    • Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corp. v. Public Service Comm’n (p72)
    • Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. (p76)
  • Review the Constitution of the United States of America
  • Review current events

Deliverable(s):

  • Complete two (2) comments on the Course Blog no later than Friday evening at 9p

Week 5, Classes 8 & 9

Before Class:

  • Read and prepare the cases and materials in Chapter 5, Contracts Overview, Chapter 6, The Agreement and Chapter 7, Consideration
  • Watch the videos on Contract Law

During Class:

  • Discuss the cases and materials in Chapter 5, Contracts Overview, Chapter 6, The Agreement and Chapter 7, Consideration
    • Day v. Caton (p101)
    • Williams v. Walker – Thomas Furniture Store (p104)
    • Wille v. Southwestern Bell Telephone Company (p108)
    • Lucy v. Zehmer (p114)
    • Lefkowitz v. Great Minneapolis Surplus Store, Inc. (p116)
    • Morrison v. Thoelke (p122)
    • A. G. King Tree Surgeons v. Deeb (p129)
  • Review current events

Deliverable(s):

  • TID #1 available on Sunday at 1p
  • TID #1 Initial Response due on Thursday no later than 11p
  • Complete two (2) comments on the Course Blog no later than Friday evening at 9p

Module 2: Contracts

Week 6, Classes 10 & 11

Before Class:

  • Read and prepare the cases and materials in Chapter 6, The Agreement, and Chapter 7, Consideration
  • Watch the videos on Contract Law

During Class:

  • Discuss the cases and materials in Chapter 6, The Agreement and Chapter 7, Consideration
    • Lucy v. Zehmer (p114)
    • Lefkowitz v. Great Minneapolis Surplus Store, Inc. (p116)
    • Morrison v. Thoelke (p122)
    • A. G. King Tree Surgeons v. Deeb (p129)

Deliverable(s):

  • TID #1 comment period closes on Sunday at 11p
  • Complete two (2) comments on the Course Blog no later than Friday evening at 9p

Week 7, Class 12 & 13

Before Class:

  • Read and prepare the cases and materials in Chapter 8, Contractual Capacity and Chapter 9, Genuineness of Assent
  • Watch the videos on Contract Law

During Class:

  • Discuss the cases and materials in Chapter 8, Contractual Capacity and Chapter 9, Genuineness of Assent
    • Harvey v. Hadfield (p137)
    • Raffles v. Wichelhaus and Another (p144)
    • Vokes v. Arthur Murray, Inc. (p149)
    • Sellers v. Looper (p152)
    • Puckett Paving v. Carrier Leasing Corp. (p154)
    • Bergeron v. Dupont (p156)
    • Miller v. Plains Insurance Co. (p158)
  • Review current events

Deliverable(s):

  • TID #2 available on Sunday at 1p
  • TID #2 Initial Response due on Thursday no later than 11p
  • Complete two (2) comments on the Course Blog no later than Friday evening at 9p

Week 8, Classes 14 & 15

Before Class:

  • Read and prepare the cases and materials in Chapter 10, Writing and Form and Chapter 11, Legality
  • Watch the videos on Contract Law

During Class:

  • Discuss the cases and materials in Chapter 10, Writing and Form and Chapter 11, Legality
    • Louron Industries, Inc. v. Holman (p165)
    • Laos v. Soble (p176)
    • Markus & Nocka v. Julian Goodrich Architects, Inc. (p178)
    • Frederick v. Professional Bldg. Main. Indus. Inc. (p181)
    • Hygrade Oil Co. v. New Jersey Bank (p183)
  • Review current events

Deliverable(s):

  • TID #2 comment period closes on Sunday at 11p
  • Complete two (2) comments on the Course Blog no later than Friday evening at 9p

Week 9, Classes 16 & 17

Before Class:

  • Read and prepare the cases and materials in Chapter 12, Performance and Discharge and Chapter 13, Remedies for Breach of Contract
  • Watch the videos on Contract Law

During Class:

  • Discuss the cases and materials in Chapter 12, Performance and Discharge and Chapter 13, Remedies for Breach of Contract
    • Plante v. Jacob (p191)
    • Parker v. Arthur Murray, Inc. (p195)
    • Hadley v. Baxendale (p201)
    • Tower City Grain Co. v. Richman (p205)
    • Campbell Soup Co. v. Wentz (p207)
    • Parker v. Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp. (p209)
  • Review current events

Deliverable(s):

  • Complete two (2) comments on the Course Blog no later than Friday evening at 9p

Module 3: Business Associations

Week 10, Classes 18 & 19

Before Class:

  • Read and prepare the cases and materials in Chapter 14, Agency and Chapter 15, Sole Proprietorships and Partnerships
  • Watch the videos on Agency Law and Business Organizations

During Class:

  • Discuss the cases and materials in Chapter 14, Agency and Chapter 15, Sole Proprietorships and Partnerships
    • Helene A. Gordon et al. v. Andrew Tobias (p217)
    • Robert M. Bailey v. Richard Worton D/B/A Worton Asphalt & Paving (p218)
    • Carl Shen v. Leo A. Daly Company (p221)
    • Reilly v. Meffe (p233)
    • In Re Ranch (p238)
    • Sriraman v. Patel (p241)
    • Laplace v. Laplace (p244)
    • Bartlett v. Pickford (p249)
  • Review current events

Deliverable(s):

  • TID #3 available on Sunday at 1p
  • TID #3 Initial Response due on Thursday no later than 11p
  • Complete two (2) comments on the Course Blog no later than Friday evening at 9p

Week 11, Classes 20 & 21

Before Class:

  • Read and prepare the cases and materials in Chapter 16, Corporations and Hybrid Forms of Organization
  • Watch the videos on Business Organizations

During Class:

  • Discuss the cases and materials in Chapter 16, Corporations and Hybrid Forms of Organization
    • Haseotes v. Cumberland Farms, Inc. (p264)
    • Brehm v. Eisner (p267)
  • Review current events

Deliverable(s):

  • TID #3 comment period closes on Sunday at 11p
  • Complete two (2) comments on the Course Blog no later than Friday evening at 9p

Module 4: Regulatory Environment

Week 12, Classes 22 & 23

Before Class:

  • Read and prepare the cases and materials in Chapter 17, Employment Law, Regulation and Labor Law
  • Watch the videos on Employment Law OverviewRegulation and Labor Law

During Class:

  • Discuss the cases and materials in Chapter 17, Employment Law, Regulation and Labor Law
    • Metcalf v. Intermountain Gas Co. (p284)
    • Cocchiara v. Lithia Motors, Inc. (p286)
    • Corning Glass Works v. Brennan (p289)
    • City of Ontario v. Quon (p298)
  • Review current events

Deliverable(s):

  • Complete two (2) comments on the Course Blog no later than Friday evening at 9p

Week 13, Classes 24 & 25

Before Class:

During Class:

  • Discuss the cases and materials in Chapter 18, Employment Discrimination
    • Price Waterhouse v. Hopkins (p313)
    • Smith v. Monsanto Chemical Co. (p315)
    • EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch Stores, Inc. (p317)
    • Faragher v. City of Boca Raton (p322)
    • Griggs v. Duke Power Co. (p325)
    • Ricci v. DeStefano (p327)
    • Taxman v. Board of Education (p332)
    • Grutter v. Bollinger (p333)
  • Review current events

Deliverable(s):

  • TID #4 available on Sunday at 1p
  • TID #4 Initial Response due on Thursday no later than 11p
  • Complete two (2) comments on the Course Blog no later than Friday evening at 9p

Week 14, Class 26

Before Class:

  • Read and prepare the cases and materials in Chapter 19, Antitrust Law
  • Watch the videos on Antitrust Law

During Class:

  • Discuss the cases and materials in Chapter 19, Antitrust Law
    • The Standard Oil Company of New Jersey et al v. U.S. (p340)
    • California Dental Association v. FTC (p342)
    • FTC v. Superior Court Trial Lawyers Association (p345)
    • Palmer v. BRG Of Georgia, Inc. (p346)
    • Interstate Circuit v. U.S. (p349)
    • United States v. Grinnell Corporation et al (p352)
    • Cargill, Inc. & Excel Corporation v. Monfort of Colorado, Inc. (p356)
    • Illinois Tool Works, Inc. v. Independent Ink, Inc. (p358)
    • Lippa’s, Inc. v. Lenox, Inc. (p360)
  • Review current events

Deliverable(s):

  • TID #4 comment period closes on Sunday at 11p
  • Success Plan due Tuesday no later than 5:18p

Week 15, Classes 27 & 28

Deliverable(s):

  • Discuss the Final Exam. The final exam will be a writing assignment requiring each student to define, interpret, and analyze a topic or topics related to the course materials. Details TBA

Do You Offer Extra Credit?

I do not offer extra credit in my courses. If you are diligent during the semester, meet and complete the requirements all of the Deliverables as required in a timely manner there should be no need for extra credit. Please visit the Grading section of the Assessment page of my Course Polices for additional information.