Academic and Professional Integrity

Students must follow the Academic and Professional Integrity Policy outlined in the Student Handbook. in addition to the specific Academic and Professional Integrity Policy of the Stillman School of Business:

  1. Dependability: Candidates are reliable, timely, and consistent in their presence and preparation for courses at the university and in their field settings.
  2. Respect and empathy: Candidates are respectful in their address, writing, language, and physical space toward faculty, university staff, school personnel, peers, and students in the field.
  3. Open-mindedness: candidates respect the context and experience of others; developing the skills to use that information in classroom conversation, writing, and lesson planning.
  4. Integrity: candidates submit original work, fully cite all sources associated with the development of their work (including information from the internet), and recognize that the university fully supports the use of anti-plagiarism software in support of academic integrity. (Original student work is expected. Any work containing plagiarized material will result in an automatic “0” for the assignment.)
  5. Passion for the profession: Candidates display, in action, word, and commitment, their passion for the profession of teaching, the right for all children to positive and productive learning environments, and their access to recognition that life as a teacher means dedication to life-long learning.

Plagiarism is wrong. I strongly advise against engaging in any activity that might be considered or misinterpreted as or appear to be plagiarism. This sort of activity includes using someone else’s ideas or work and representing it as your own, failing to give credit to a source of information correctly, and paraphrasing another’s work without credit, among others. Plagiarism also includes using the text or internet to find answers to quiz and/or exam questions and/or collaborating with others when completing a quiz and/or exam.

If you are unsure of what constitutes plagiarism, you will find a good primer on the subject here. Please visit the site and review its materials carefully.

If you are wondering if there are any penalties for plagiarism, please visit the Seton Hall statement on Academic and Professional Integrity linked above.

If I discover that you have engaged in plagiarism, you will fail the course. If I conclude that you knew, or should have known, that your submission needed to be properly sourced or because you negligently did not take the steps necessary to avoid plagiarism, you will fail the course.

This policy includes a statement on the Use of Generative AI.

Use of Artificial Intelligence and GenAI

Background

Generative AI refers to a class of Artificial Intelligence (AI) systems that can create or generate new content, such as text, images, audio, or video. These systems are trained on large amounts of data and use statistical techniques to learn the patterns and characteristics of the data. Once trained, they can generate new content similar to the training data but not identical. Generative AI models include diverse applications, including natural language processing, computer vision, speech recognition, and more.

Generative AI applications include, but are not limited to, ChatGPT, DALL-E, Stable Diffusion, CoPilot, and Claude 3, among others. DALL-E is a generative AI model developed by OpenAI. It is a variant of the GPT-3 model that can generate images from text descriptions. ChatGPT is a large-scale pre-trained language model also developed by OpenAI. It is based on transformer architecture and is trained on massive text data, allowing it to generate human-like text.

The use of artificial intelligence (AI) has grown tremendously since its release in November 2022.  AI use in business is anticipated to grow “…37.3% between 2023 and 2030.”  Accordingly, students must be prepared to use AI responsibly, ethically, socially, and legally. AI literacy skills are a component of digital literacy that students must strive to learn and apply as it is anticipated that “Employees more skilled at deriving value from AI are more likely to be high performers, compared with those lacking AI skills.” When using AI, students must learn the advantages and disadvantages of any new technology. Students should be aware that the use of AI, in academia, business, and government, raises concerns about accessibility, bias, discrimination, security, privacy, law (including intellectual property issues), ethical issues, accuracy of information generated, transparency, and governance, both private, state, and federal.

Purpose

In addition to the Academic and Professional Integrity Policy, this AI course policy outlines the appropriate and ethical use of artificial intelligence (AI) in all writing assignments requiring original work of the student, i.e.,  discussion boards, blog posts, research papers/projects, and exams. AI should be viewed as augmented intelligence rather than artificial intelligence. It does not replace a person’s intelligence, reasoning, or critical thinking but supplements it in various ways. AI in writing assignments is permitted under certain conditions to enhance learning outcomes and foster critical thinking skills. AI tools should be utilized primarily as learning aids to support students in developing writing skills, understanding grammar rules, improving language proficiency, and furthering their knowledge of the course content.

Permissible Use

Under the following guidelines, students can use AI tools to write assignments in limited amounts. AI tools may include, but are not limited to, spell and grammar checkers, plagiarism detectors, language enhancement software, and large language models, including but not limited to OpenAI’s ChatGPT, Anthropic’s Claude, Google Gemini, and Microsoft GitHub Copilot.

Guidelines for AI Usage

    1. Understanding: Students should have a basic understanding of how AI tools work and their limitations. They should rely on more than just AI-generated content; they should critically evaluate and integrate it into their writing.
    1. Originality: AI-generated content should supplement students’ original ideas rather than substitute for independent thought and analysis. Plagiarism of AI-generated content is strictly prohibited. AI tools should be used for initial brainstorming, outlining, and content development. Students are responsible for creating content in response to writing assignments (discussion boards, etc.) and creating original content for their research papers/projects. 
    1. Transparency: Students must disclose the use of AI tools in their writing assignments. This includes acknowledging the specific tools used and their contribution to the assignment:
      • Generative AI should not be used to generate content that is discriminatory or offensive in any way.
      • Generative AI may not be used to generate content intended to be submitted as your original work.
      • All AI generative prompts must be disclosed/provided before your original content appears.
      • Students are responsible for ensuring that any AI-generated information is accurate, fact-checked against credible sources, and up to date.
      • Students must not use generative AI to generate work submitted under multiple names or pseudonyms.
      • Students must refrain from using generative AI to generate work submitted to multiple assignments or courses.
      • Students must refrain from using generative AI to generate work submitted as their own after making minimal changes.
      • Generative AI results are generated based on data on which the AI tool is trained and may be similar to existing work(s). Students must use their judgment and critical thinking to avoid plagiarism.
      • Students must indicate when they have used AI-generated content in their work and provide appropriate citations.

Assignment Directions

In addition to these guidelines, see specific assignment directions and grading rubrics regarding using, incorporating, and disclosing AI tools. 

Academic Integrity

  1. Plagiarism: Submitting AI-generated content or any other material without proper attribution/citation constitutes plagiarism and will be subject to disciplinary action per Seton Hall University’s Code of Academic Integrity.
  1. Authenticity: Students are responsible for the authenticity and originality of their work, even when utilizing AI tools. They should ensure that their writing reflects their understanding and interpretation of the subject matter.
  1. Assessment: Students’ work will be assessed based on the quality of their writing, critical thinking skills, and adherence to academic standards, including disclosure of the use of AI tools. Students will not be assessed solely on their use of AI tools.
  1. Compliance: All students are required to comply with this AI policy. Non-compliance may result in academic penalties or disciplinary actions per Seton Hall University’s policies and procedures.

AI Use Disclosure

For each writing assignment, project, submission, etc.

  • Identify which, if any, AI tool(s) you used, and
  • Identify all prompts/queries that you used (include hyperlinks to all AI tools, prompts/queries, searches, and generated output, and
  • Discuss what you learned from those prompts/queries, and
  • Describe how you verified the accuracy and truth of the AI content generated, and
  • Reflect on the impact of using AI tools on the effectiveness of your research and your writing assignment, project, submission, etc.

Evaluation and Review of this Policy

This policy will be periodically reviewed to ensure its effectiveness in promoting academic integrity, learning outcomes, and the ethical use of AI in writing assignments. Students’ feedback is appreciated so that necessary revisions can be made.

NB: This policy was developed using AI platforms in consultation with Professor Susan O’Sullivan-Gavin.

Updated: May 5, 2024

A Note on Sexual Misconduct

Our school is committed to fostering a safe, productive learning environment. Title IX and our school policy prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex. Sexual misconduct — including harassment, domestic and dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking — is also prohibited at our school.

Our school encourages anyone experiencing sexual misconduct to talk to someone about what happened, so they can get the support they need and our school can respond appropriately.

If you wish to speak confidentially about an incident of sexual misconduct, want more information about filing a report, or have questions about school policies and procedures, please contact our Title IX Coordinator.

Remote Learning

In the event that circumstances, e.g., hurricane, COVID spike, demand it, we are prepared to adapt and return to a remote, synchronous learning environment.

The COVID-19 pandemic forced us to move to a fundamentally different set of delivery modalities, e.g., HyFlex, hybrid, remote, synchronous, or not, or some combination of approaches to teaching and learning. We are increasingly working remotely in order to accomplish our work. That remote modality demands that we adjust our understanding of acceptable protocols for attendance and participation, whether a meeting or course attendance, engagement and participation.

While working together using a digital platform, e.g., Teams, Zoom, Slack, etc. it is important that you join the session with a live camera and muted mic. A live camera helps to create a sense of community and will help all of us to engage effectively during our discussions. If you only unmute your mic when speaking we can avoid feedback, unsolicited input from family, pets and others as well as any random noise. If you cannot be seen or heard by your classmates it will be difficult to actively engage in course meetings. That will have negative implications for your grade results. Please review the Protocols for Online Meetings and Classes for more information.

Online Courses

Before you move forward with any online or hybrid/blended course, I suggest that you complete the short survey prepared by the Teaching, Learning and Technology Center (TLTC) to help you in your decision to pursue online learning.

Some of you may be unfamiliar with an online learning environment. While the subject matter is generally the same as a face-to-face (F2F) course the differences in platform and delivery are frequently a challenge for some students. Online courses require you to be self-directed and organize your work differently than your previous experience in F2F classes. Online does not mean less structure or work. It is not an “easier” course than one offered in a F2F environment.

It is important that you consider a number of factors before you enroll in an online or hybrid/blended course. Those factors include time management skills, learning style and technology skills and access. Online learning anticipates that you are an active learner … someone who is motivated, self-directed and stays on task. If you prefer a more traditional lecture style learning environment where you use class meetings as an organizing structure to complete your assignments then an online course may not be the best choice. In my experience, considering these factors is an important prerequisite to enrolling in a course that offers an online or hybrid/blended learning environment.

You do not have to be physically present in a classroom or attend at a set time, or place, to take one of my online courses. There are no scheduled class meetings in my online courses. If you are enrolled in an online course, you need to be self-motivated and stay on task. All of our course interactions will occur in the cloud using Teams and Blackboard. That said, however, you will have assignments that must be completed when due. We will use Teams as our primary communication and collaboration platform. Please DM me in Teams if you need to reach me or have a question. We use Team for our video conversations, when necessary.

If you are concerned with your comfort level with an online learning environment, please DM me in Teams. I am happy to discuss your concerns.

Recording

Recording of classroom lectures, discussions, reproduction of web-based course materials and the redistribution of those recordings or other class materials for any purpose, without my written permission, is prohibited. My purpose is to assist in maintaining student academic integrity, to protect student and faculty privacy, to respect my rights to instructional materials, and to enhance compliance with copyright law.

Audio or visual recording, transmission, distribution of classroom lectures and discussions or reproduction of web-based course materials is prohibited, unless I have provided express written permission (on syllabi, course sites, email, or signed document), and all students in the class have been informed that audio/video recording may occur, and any guest speakers have also given permission. Permission to allow the recording is not a transfer of any copyright in the recording.

Any authorized recording of lectures or class presentations, distribution of classroom lectures and discussions or reproduction of web-based course materials, when authorized, is solely for the purpose of individual or group study with other students enrolled in the same class. The recording may not be reproduced, and/or uploaded to a web platform and/or environment that are publicly accessible or accessible to others not enrolled in the class.

Recordings of classes, course materials, or lecture notes, distribution of classroom lectures and discussions or reproduction of web-based course materials, when authorized, may not be exchanged or distributed for commercial purposes, for compensation, or for any purpose other than study by students enrolled in the class. Public distribution of such materials may constitute copyright infringement in violation of federal or state law, and/or University policy. Course materials include outlines, slides, presentations, readings, or any other content made available to students by me, including those made available through any course reserves system, learning management system, or equivalent.

It is not a violation of my policy for a student determined by the Office of Disability Support Services (DSS) to be entitled to educational accommodations to record or adapt classroom lectures or course materials for personal study. Students entitled to accommodations including recording must provide written notification to me from DSS. The restrictions on third-party web and commercial distribution set out apply to these cases.

Students must destroy any approved recordings at the end of the semester in which they are enrolled in the class unless they receive the instructor’s written permission to retain them or are entitled to retain them as an accommodation authorized by DSS.

Violation of this policy may subject a student to disciplinary action.

N.B. Policies of other Universities consulted in preparing this policy include those from the University of Virginia and Rutgers University.

Plagiarism

Cheating Is WrongPlagiarism is wrong. I strongly advise against engaging in any activity that might be considered or misinterpreted as or appear to be plagiarism. This sort of activity includes using someone else’s ideas or work and representing it as your own, failing to give credit to a source of information correctly, and paraphrasing another’s work without credit, among others. Plagiarism also includes using the text or internet to find answers to quiz and/or exam questions and/or collaborating with others when completing a quiz and/or exam.

If you are unsure of what constitutes plagiarism, you will find a good primer at plagiarism.org. Please visit the site and review its materials carefully.

If you are wondering if there are any penalties for plagiarism, please visit the Seton Hall statement on Academic and Professional Integrity.

If I discover that you have engaged in plagiarism, you will fail the course. If I conclude that you knew, or should have known, that your submission needed to be correctly sourced or because you negligently did not take the steps necessary to avoid plagiarism, you will fail the course.

This policy includes the statement on the Use of Generative AI included in the Course Policies section of this site.

One last thing …

If you are enrolled in my course, you have agreed to conduct yourself according to this policy on plagiarism. There is no opt-out alternative!

Engagement

Engagement, i.e., attendance, preparation, participation and successful, and timely, completion of course deliverables, is mandatory. You will not succeed in our course if you do not engage.

It’s that simple.

Your performance will improve if you attend class regularly, are well prepared AND participate effectively in the learning environment, whether F2F or digital.

Yes  … it IS that simple!

You are an important part of the team, including your professor and classmates, that create an effective learning environment. Your engagement in our course learning environment plays a significant role in my assessment of your performance, in other words, the grade you earn in our course. Our course will demand a substantial investment of time and effort and so will require a significant amount of preparation. You need to be self-motivated and stay on task in order to succeed. Dr. Jeffrey Bennett has developed some terrific “Hints on How to Succeed in College Classes” that I strongly suggest you review before we begin our course.

I will take attendance every time we meet in class. I will even take attendance if we have a class meeting in a virtual environment using a video conferencing platform. While our meetings will consist of both lectures and discussions, I am not a big fan of the “Sage on the Stage” model of teaching. Discussion will be the primary form of interaction in our course. Of course, those discussions will be both F2F and digital. We will use a variety of technology supported platforms to support or interactions, both in and out of class meetings. Your engagement in our digital discussions, whether enrolled in a F2F or web-based course, will also be an important part of my assessment of your performance.

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced us to move to a fundamentally different set of delivery modalities, e.g., HyFlex, hybrid, remote, synchronous or unsynchronous or some combination of approaches to teaching and learning. We are increasingly working remotely in order to accomplish our work. That remote modality demands that we adjust our understanding of acceptable protocols for attendance and participation, whether a meeting or course attendance, engagement and participation.

While working together using a digital platform, e.g., Teams, Zoom, Slack, etc. it is important that you join the session with a live camera and muted mic. A live camera helps to create a sense of community and will help all of us to engage effectively during our discussions. If you only unmute your mic when speaking we can avoid feedback, unsolicited input from family, pets and others as well as any random noise. If you cannot be seen or heard by your classmates it will be difficult to actively engage in course meetings. That will have negative implications for your grade results. Please review the Protocols for Online Meetings and Classes for more information.

Remember … if you are consistently unprepared, or even underprepared, it will be very difficult to take full advantage of our course learning environment. That lack of engagement is a lost opportunity for you and will reflect poorly when I assess your performance.

The Engagement Rubric below has been adapted by Professor Sara Calhoun Davis from The Teaching Professor and forms the basis of assessment of your course engagement.

Engagement Rubric

A

B

C / D

F

Peer Interaction

Actively supports, engages, and listens to peers (ongoing)

Makes a sincere effort to interact with peers (ongoing)

Limited interaction with peers

Virtually no interaction with peers

Preparation

Fully prepared for every aspect of the course

Mostly, if not fully, prepared (ongoing)

Preparation is inconsistent

Rarely or never prepared

Participation

Plays an active role in discussions (ongoing)

Participates constructively in discussions (ongoing)

When prepared, participates constructively in discussions

Comments vague if given; frequently demonstrates lack of interest

Contribution to Class

Comments advance level and depth of dialogue

Relevant comments are based on assigned material

When prepared, relevant comments are based on assignments

Demonstrates a noticeable lack of interest on occasion

Group Dynamics

Group dynamic and level of discussion are often better because of student’s engagement

Group dynamic and level of discussion are occasionally better, but not worse, because of student’s engagement

Group dynamic and level of discussion are sometimes disrupted by student’s engagement

Group dynamic and level of discussion are often disrupted by student’s engagement

You can influence my assessment of your course engagement in a positive way by
  • Becoming more active and/or making more effective comments that raise overall level of discussion and set examples for others, and
  • Asking thoughtful questions that will enhance discussion and engage peers, and
  • Listening carefully to, supporting, and engaging your peers in discussion. This will essentially improve others’ learning experience.
That said, you can also influence my assessment of your course engagement in a negative way if you
  • Do not engage in the course regularly, through attendance, preparation and participation, even though you meet attendance requirements. Even though you may have submitted assigned work, your contribution will not have added to the course discussion, or
  • Dominating discussions, thereby restricting others’ participation, and
  • Disrupting others’ opportunity to listen and/or participate, or
  • Making negative, offensive, and/or disrespectful comments during discussions, or
  • Violating the privacy of individuals, or
  • Using electronic devices such as, but not limited to, a cell phone, tablet, or computer for personal or unrelated coursework during class unless instructed to do so. There are no exceptions.

Deliverables

Reading

You will have reading deliverables for each class meeting … they must be completed before you arrive for class. If you are not prepared for class it will be very difficult, if not impossible, for you to engage effectively in our class. If you consistently do not engage effectively in class discussions it will have a negative impact on your performance and, therefore, my assessment of your performance. Your success in our course will require you to actively participate in the discussions that we conduct in person and in the cloud. The difference between engagement in a F2F and an online course is really about the platform.

Writing on a Digital Platform

Many of you may be unfamiliar with writing in a digital platform. Since this may be the first time that you will work in a digital platform I suggest that you review Professor Gerald Lucas’ essay, Writing Top Ten, as a starting point. If you are unfamiliar with the appropriate way to source your digital writing, and most of you will be, please review his discussion of Digital Citation for additional guidance on citation when using a digital platform. Since the correct use of hyperlinks will be important to your success in our course discussions I recommend that you consider his advice on using links in your digital writing.

When you use digital platforms to support your submissions you must incorporate multimedia (audio, video and images) in all of your writing deliverables. It is important for you to transition from thinking in terms of text on paper to a text+ environment. As Bo Ren suggests in his essay Why I Believe in Text,

“The future of text is going to be text+ (text + multimedia e.g. photos, videos, gifs, podcasts etc). … readers and users want text+ for a faster, more immersive, gratifying consumption experience. Multimedia stories are the future of text.”

If you have never used Teams before, visit the Microsoft Teams for Education – Quick Start Guide and video training for Teams.

Writing and Research

Many of your course deliverables will involve research and writing. Those assignments will also require that you meet both content and form requirements. I describe the requirements of each deliverable in terms of minimums to provide you with the opportunity to exceed those minimums. Most deliverables involve the use of digital platforms to deliver the content you have developed.

The content requirements are straightforward. You must provide a thoughtful, substantive and well-reasoned submission that draws upon the course readings and materials and that details your perspective and analysis of the implications of the issues raised in the question(s) posed. It is also important that you address the ethics issues raised by the assignment. You must also include sources sufficient to support all aspects of your submission.

The content requirements represent a significant expectation of performance. I may set a minimum requirement for the number of sources used in your submissions. I expect that your sources will be sufficient, both in quality and number, to support the breadth of analysis that I have described above.

The form requirements are equally straightforward. These form requirements are generally described in terms of a minimum word count and the use of live, in-text hyperlinks in lieu of footnotes/endnotes (please see Writing on a Digital Platform above). When you use digital platforms to support your submissions you must incorporate multimedia (audio, video and images) in all of your writing deliverables.

My assessment of your submission will be based upon the extent to which you meet the minimum requirements as to content and form required by that particular deliverable. You can improve your prospects for a strong outcome by exceeding the minimum requirements of the deliverable, i.e., expanding the scope of your content and analysis of the question posed, including addressing potential ethics issues, broadening the scope of the sources used to support that content and analysis, and meeting the form requirements outlined above.

It is important to remember, though, that if you simply meet the minimum requirements the result will be an average grade.

Writing deliverables will be completed using a digital platform unless otherwise specified. Please see your course syllabus for the specific assignment requirements.

Do not post a Word document, pdf or Google doc unless the deliverable specifically requires it.

Connectivity

When taking a quiz or exam, please be certain that your broadband connection is reliable and stable. My students in past semesters have occasionally experienced connectivity issues. In the past, this type of connectivity problem arises as a result of an interruption in your connection (a hiccup in your broadband connection) to Blackboard or where the test has opened in a new tab or window. When that happens your connection times out in the first tab/window while you are working in the second. That has the same effect as the first possible cause … your connection to Bb is interrupted. Your quiz/exam stays active in the second tab/window but stops recording questions because the connection was interrupted due to the timeout in the first tab/window. Your best option is to be sure that your browser opens the quiz/exam in the same tab/window where you originally logged into Blackboard.

Most frequently connectivity issues arise when using Wi-FI particularly when using a public Wi-Fi hotspot. It is best if you avoid public Wi-Fi hotspots when taking a quiz/exam. Be certain that your Wi-Fi connection is strong and stable. I suggest, if possible, that you connect your computer directly to your Internet source (router) via an Ethernet cable. This should assure that you have a stable connection while completing the course assignments.

If your connection is interrupted, I suggest that you exit Bb, login again, try to reenter the same quiz/exam attempt and finish the quiz/exam.

In Class

What should you bring to class … in addition to yourself?

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced us to move to a fundamentally different set of delivery modalities, e.g., HyFlex, hybrid, remote, synchronous or unsynchronous or some combination of approaches to teaching and learning. We are increasingly working remotely in order to accomplish our work. That remote modality demands that we adjust our understanding of acceptable protocols for attendance and participation, whether a meeting or course attendance, engagement and participation.

While working together using a digital platform, e.g., Teams, Zoom, Slack, etc. it is important that you join the session with a live camera and muted mic. A live camera helps to create a sense of community and will help all of us to engage effectively during our discussions. If you only unmute your mic when speaking we can avoid feedback, unsolicited input from family, pets and others as well as any random noise. If you cannot be seen or heard by your classmates it will be difficult to actively engage in course meetings. That will have negative implications for your grade results. Please review the Protocols for Online Meetings and Classes for more information.

First, the course text or any materials required for that class are a must. It is always a good idea to buy the course text (if one is required) early in the semester. If you have not purchased the text, you will not be able to complete the reading assignments and then you will not meet my expectations related to in-class participation. That will not be good.

Next up is your device of choice (laptop, tablet, mobile) to bring to class. We will be actively using technology to search for answers to the questions raised during our discussions. Just be sure you can function in a class environment with the device you carry that day. Small screens and keyboards are occasionally difficult to work with under the wrong circumstances.

Finally, bring something to take notes. Many prefer to take notes using a device but you may prefer to use paper (a venerable technology in its own right) to take notes in class. Whatever works for you … go for it!